During my caregiving years, I was always reading one of Jane Austen's novels. At first I was confused by my enthrallment: I'm a reader, I like novels, and go on reading binges when I discover a new mystery writer with a series, and in my own writing have analyzed literary texts. But this relationship to Austen's novels was something new. It wasn't that they held me in thrall, it is that they seemed to hold me together. I thought of it as  "Care Reading." I describe a part of my experience of "Care Reading" in an oped in The New York Times: http://www.nytimes.com/2015/12/20/opinion/jane-austens-guide-to-alzheimers.html?emc=eta1

"Bibliotherapy" is a more formal term for this. In her New Yorker article on the subject, Ceridwin Dovey defines it as "a very broad term for the ancient practice of encouraging reading for therapeutic effect." http://www.newyorker.com/culture/cultural-comment/can-reading-make-you-happier

Ella Berthoud and Susan Elderkin's The Novel Cure: From Abandonment to Zestlessness: 751 Books to Cure What Ails You, offers wonderful suggestions of books.

I would love to hear from other caregivers about what your "Care Reading" books have been.